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dc.contributor.authorRodríguez-Gómez, Gregorio
dc.contributor.authorIbarra-Sáiz, María Soledad
dc.contributor.authorGallego-Noche, Beatriz
dc.contributor.authorGómez-Ruiz, Miguel Ángel
dc.contributor.otherDidácticaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-09T11:06:53Z
dc.date.available2014-12-09T11:06:53Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-09T00:00:00Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10498/16954
dc.description.abstractAs expressed by Boud (2007) “the great innovation in assessment in the 1960s was the introduction of ideas from educational measurement. This was important then as it made assessment thinking more systematic and introduced terminology, such as reliability and validity. It also introduced new techniques such as multiple-choice tests. In the 1970s, the distinction between formative and summative assessment was introduced. In the 1980s, the value of self and peer assessment was accepted. In the 1990s, the consequences of assessment for student learning were recognized. Just because an assessment activity satisfies some technical measurement requirements doesn’t mean that it has a worthwhile impact on what students learn and how they go about approaching their learning.”en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.sourceECER 2010 Helsinki The European Conference on Educational Researchen_US
dc.subjectassessmenten_US
dc.subjectparticipationen_US
dc.subjectHigher Educationen_US
dc.titleThe participation of university students in assessment: An international perspective of students and teachers in higher educationen_US
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObjecten_US
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess


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